Drying Herbs and Tea Blends

Drying Herbs and Tea Blends

Drying herbs, and keeping their flavor and medicine intact, is a bit tricky in the damp Pacific Northwest. Herbs need to be dried as quickly as possible with low heat. 90 – 95 degrees F. is perfect. Too high heat and you run the risk of quickly drying the outside of the plant with the inside still containing moisture. This means plant material that will decompose and mold from ...

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Devil’s Club

Devil’s Club ~ Oplopanax horridum
The following, while weighty in information, is in no way complete in the actions and uses of Devil’s Club. It’s a plant worth studying in depth.

Smooth muscle relaxant –
Smooth muscles are located in the walls of hollow internal structures of the body. Lymphatic vessels, urinary, uterus, reproductive tracts, gastrointestinal, respiratory, iris ciliary muscle are examples of smooth muscles. Smooth muscles do their thing independent of conscious thought. Spasms can occur due to a ...

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Salix ~ Willow

 

Willow

Willow – 90 species of Salix here in the Pacific Northwest and all work the same as far as their medicinal content goes. The bark of the willow canes is what is used.

Willow works so well to relieve the pain and inflammation of toothaches, spasming muscles, tension headaches, strains, sprains, arthritis, and back pain, and a veritable ...

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The Truth About Elderberries

elder
Elder is probably the most well-known antiviral herb on the market at present. It can assist in reducing inflammation in the sinuses to relieve congestion, eliminate metabolic waste products, stimulate sweating to remediate fevers, and reduce flu and cold symptoms. Elderberries contain shikimic acid, an intermediary in the production of Tamiflu, an anti-flu pharmaceutical. While commercial production of Tamiflu uses the shikimic acid in Star Anise, elderberries also contain this valuable ...

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Cottonwood and Willow: Nature’s Pain Relievers

Cottonwood, Populus balsamifera, is the largest broadleaf deciduous tree in the Pacific Northwest. It is a member of the Salicaceae family, which makes it willow’s cousin. Cottonwood trees exist near rivers and lakes. They grow to be very tall and are on the narrow side. I’m not talking about Lombardy poplars, Populus nigra, the super skinny trees you’ll find in prairies and open ranges used as windscreens on farms ...

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Cough and Cold Elixir

CoughandcoldremedyGreetings! After a hot long summer, the rains, cooler temperatures, and early nights are here, and in my humble opinion, are very much appreciated. I can’t remember the last time I actually looked forward to a wet rainy winter. We’ll see how it goes this year. The plants had a very interesting growing season. I was talking with one of my long time apprentices just today about this. We’ve been out in ...

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Quit Buggin’ Me!

It’s that time again, folks! Mosquito, spider, ant, and biting pest season. Sitting outside at a BBQ, camping, and just trying to relax and enjoy the nice weather outside can be a bit frustrating when you become the object of dining for the insects that come around this time of year. How bad are they where you live? The commercial products that are made to ...

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Recipe: Pickled Dandelion Flower Buds

Use these pickled buds as a condiment like any pickle; mix into tuna, egg, green or potato salad; and enjoy straight from the jar!

When making pickled dandelion flower buds, you’ll want to make sure the flower buds have not opened yet. Check out the picture on the right. The top is a dandelion flower bud that has not opened yet. The bottom is a flower that has opened, been pollinated, and ...

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Roasted Dandelion Roots

The entire dandelion plant is a primo liver healer and strengthener. We can live without our fingers, we can lose an arm and still keep going, but we can’t live without our liver! Dandelion nourishes and strengthens our immune system. It is a digestive bitter, as it heals and nourishes the entire digestive tract. It helps us to get full nutrition from the foods we eat, and tones and nourishes the spleen, skin, nerves, kidneys, glands, urinary, circulatory, lymph, and gallbladder. It ...

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Recipe: Nettle Pesto

 

 

 

Nettle Pesto!

 

 

 

 

Nothing says, “See ya, winter!” like harvesting nettles in the early spring for food and medicine. After a long dark winter, harvesting nettles is a very welcome treat. For me, the abundance of chlorophyll, antioxidants, macro and micro nutrients, and alkaloids in nettles provides the quintessential shot of life that can be so badly needed.

Not only are nettles incredibly nutrient rich, especially in iron, selenium, calcium, niacin, magnesium, and ...

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